Pasta

  • Baked Ziti

    Now here's a classic midweek meal, or a hot dish to bring to a potluck. Baked ziti is a lot like American lasagna, but easier to make; it has practically the same ingredients but you don't have to fuss with lots of layers or broken noodles. This recipe is a pretty basic version, but everyone who makes baked ziti has their own unique tricks and twists to it. Some vary the cheeses, some the meat, some make meatless versions, and some people leave out the tomato sauce for a truly cheese-tastic casserole. This version uses bulk Italian sausage, as well as a key fresh herb. In summer, that would be basil. In winter, rosemary. You could also easily use savory, sage, thyme or parsley. Ziti is a pretty common pasta shape in most areas, but you can substitute penne pasta if you can't find it. You want a substantial short pasta shape with places to hold the sauce and meat. You can make this ahead, and either refrigerate or freeze before you do the final baking.

  • Butternut Squash Ravioli with Truffle Oil, Butter Sauce and Prawns.

    Rob Feenie says this is the most popular dish he has created. In this version we skip a few steps by purchasing the raviolis. from Zara's, from their base on Granville Island, from Whole Foods or from Bosa Foods.

  • Chicken Linguini

    Pasta tossed with red chilies, garlic, diced chicken and Parmesan.
    Fairly quick: about 15 minutes prep and total time 30 minutes.

  • Farfalle with Golden Beets and Beet Greens

    Beets, botanically-known as Beta vulgaris, evolved from wild seabeet, which is a native of coastlines from India to Britain and is the ancestor of all cultivated forms of beet. Beetroot was offered to Apollo in his temple at Delphi, where it was reckoned to be worth its own weight in silver! Sea beet was first domesticated in the eastern Mediterranean and Middle East – although it was only the leaves that were eaten at that time.
    Golden Beets were made available to home cooks in the 1940's when introduced by the Burpee Seed Company. They feature a mild flavor with an inviting gold color. They are also a tad sweeter, as well as a tad less “earthy”, than red beets, and roasting really brings out their sweetness. The greens are delicious, as well as incredibly nutritious.
    This recipe uses both the root and leaves of the golden beet.

  • Fettuccine with Butternut Squash and Mushrooms

    September through February is Squash season!

  • Fettuccine with Creamy Red Pepper Feta Sauce

    The sauce is to die for!. If you add chunks of sauteed chicken it is a whole meal.

  • Fettuccine with Morels, and Tarragon

    Morels live in and on the edge of forested areas. Look for ash, aspen, elm, and oak trees, around which morels often grow. Early in the spring as the ground is warming, you'll find them on south-facing slopes in fairly open areas. As the season progresses, go deeper into the woods and onto north-facing slopes.

  • Fusilli with Meyer Lemon Cream Sauce

    Remember that Fusilli is a heavy pasta and takes 16 minutes in boiling water to cook.

  • Gemelli with Italian Sausage and Arugula

    The magic combination: easy to make and great tasting!

  • Grilled Tomato Pasta

    Grilling the tomatoes concentrates their flavor slightly while still leaving them fresh enough to make a light, juicy sauce. Studded with cubes of fresh cheese, this dish is a summery crowd-pleaser.

  • Linguine / Zucchini with Bay scallops and Bagna Cauda Sauce

    OK, so we use a cup of whipping cream in this one, but is is not nearly as heavy as an Alfredo sauce and its got lots of veggies, so just be quiet.
    Takes only 15 minutes to prep.

  • Linguine con Peperoni Arrostiti

    Peppers are used in two ways in this recipe: once as a vegetable and pureed, as part of the pasta sauce! Rena says it is a light sauce, with a sophisticated taste. You can also use penne, fettuccine or any other pasta that holds sauce well.

  • Linguine with Garlic Shrimp and Basil

    Takes about 25 to 40 minutes to make.

  • Orecchiette with Kale, Bacon and Sun-Dried Tomatoes

    Orecchiette (little ears) pasta i a classic shape that is ideal for this chunky sauce. You can substitute farfalle if you like. You can also substitute chard for the kale.

  • Pasta alla Puttanesca

    Pasta in the er, um, style of the ladies of the Evening
    The two popular explanations regarding the origin of Pasta alla Putanesca are that,

  • Spinach and Parmesan Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms

    Like a pizza, with a mushroom crust

  • Strozzapreti with Duck Ragu

    Can also be made with a whole duck, or even pork ribs.

  • Tagliatelle Putanesca

    An Italian Primo course from San Gimignano

  • Tagliatelle with Bolognese Sauce

    This is Bologna's greatest claim to fame. A smaller portion makes a great Primo course, or a slightly larger portion with a few veggies added, a main meal. We first ate it with an appetizer of prosciutto and melon (cantaloupe), which paired very nicely.

  • Tomato Fettuccine with Basil and Brie

    Starts with a zesty marinade of olive oil, red wine vinegar, chopped tomatoes, minced garlic, brie cheese and basil.

Here are some links to good recipes for Pasta from other sites

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Pasta

  • Baked Ziti

    Now here's a classic midweek meal, or a hot dish to bring to a potluck. Baked ziti is a lot like American lasagna, but easier to make; it has practically the same ingredients but you don't have to fuss with lots of layers or broken noodles. This recipe is a pretty basic version, but everyone who makes baked ziti has their own unique tricks and twists to it. Some vary the cheeses, some the meat, some make meatless versions, and some people leave out the tomato sauce for a truly cheese-tastic casserole. This version uses bulk Italian sausage, as well as a key fresh herb. In summer, that would be basil. In winter, rosemary. You could also easily use savory, sage, thyme or parsley. Ziti is a pretty common pasta shape in most areas, but you can substitute penne pasta if you can't find it. You want a substantial short pasta shape with places to hold the sauce and meat. You can make this ahead, and either refrigerate or freeze before you do the final baking.

  • Butternut Squash Ravioli with Truffle Oil, Butter Sauce and Prawns.

    Rob Feenie says this is the most popular dish he has created. In this version we skip a few steps by purchasing the raviolis. from Zara's, from their base on Granville Island, from Whole Foods or from Bosa Foods.

  • Chicken Linguini

    Pasta tossed with red chilies, garlic, diced chicken and Parmesan.
    Fairly quick: about 15 minutes prep and total time 30 minutes.

  • Farfalle with Golden Beets and Beet Greens

    Beets, botanically-known as Beta vulgaris, evolved from wild seabeet, which is a native of coastlines from India to Britain and is the ancestor of all cultivated forms of beet. Beetroot was offered to Apollo in his temple at Delphi, where it was reckoned to be worth its own weight in silver! Sea beet was first domesticated in the eastern Mediterranean and Middle East – although it was only the leaves that were eaten at that time.
    Golden Beets were made available to home cooks in the 1940's when introduced by the Burpee Seed Company. They feature a mild flavor with an inviting gold color. They are also a tad sweeter, as well as a tad less “earthy”, than red beets, and roasting really brings out their sweetness. The greens are delicious, as well as incredibly nutritious.
    This recipe uses both the root and leaves of the golden beet.

  • Fettuccine with Butternut Squash and Mushrooms

    September through February is Squash season!

  • Fettuccine with Creamy Red Pepper Feta Sauce

    The sauce is to die for!. If you add chunks of sauteed chicken it is a whole meal.

  • Fettuccine with Morels, and Tarragon

    Morels live in and on the edge of forested areas. Look for ash, aspen, elm, and oak trees, around which morels often grow. Early in the spring as the ground is warming, you'll find them on south-facing slopes in fairly open areas. As the season progresses, go deeper into the woods and onto north-facing slopes.

  • Fusilli with Meyer Lemon Cream Sauce

    Remember that Fusilli is a heavy pasta and takes 16 minutes in boiling water to cook.

  • Gemelli with Italian Sausage and Arugula

    The magic combination: easy to make and great tasting!

  • Grilled Tomato Pasta

    Grilling the tomatoes concentrates their flavor slightly while still leaving them fresh enough to make a light, juicy sauce. Studded with cubes of fresh cheese, this dish is a summery crowd-pleaser.

  • Linguine / Zucchini with Bay scallops and Bagna Cauda Sauce

    OK, so we use a cup of whipping cream in this one, but is is not nearly as heavy as an Alfredo sauce and its got lots of veggies, so just be quiet.
    Takes only 15 minutes to prep.

  • Linguine con Peperoni Arrostiti

    Peppers are used in two ways in this recipe: once as a vegetable and pureed, as part of the pasta sauce! Rena says it is a light sauce, with a sophisticated taste. You can also use penne, fettuccine or any other pasta that holds sauce well.

  • Linguine with Garlic Shrimp and Basil

    Takes about 25 to 40 minutes to make.

  • Orecchiette with Kale, Bacon and Sun-Dried Tomatoes

    Orecchiette (little ears) pasta i a classic shape that is ideal for this chunky sauce. You can substitute farfalle if you like. You can also substitute chard for the kale.

  • Pasta alla Puttanesca

    Pasta in the er, um, style of the ladies of the Evening
    The two popular explanations regarding the origin of Pasta alla Putanesca are that,

  • Spinach and Parmesan Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms

    Like a pizza, with a mushroom crust

  • Strozzapreti with Duck Ragu

    Can also be made with a whole duck, or even pork ribs.

  • Tagliatelle Putanesca

    An Italian Primo course from San Gimignano

  • Tagliatelle with Bolognese Sauce

    This is Bologna's greatest claim to fame. A smaller portion makes a great Primo course, or a slightly larger portion with a few veggies added, a main meal. We first ate it with an appetizer of prosciutto and melon (cantaloupe), which paired very nicely.

  • Tomato Fettuccine with Basil and Brie

    Starts with a zesty marinade of olive oil, red wine vinegar, chopped tomatoes, minced garlic, brie cheese and basil.

Here are some links to good recipes for Pasta from other sites